Takeout & Wine Pairings

Elevate your takeout with wine!


As much as I love going out to eat, there’s something so satisfying about ordering in. If the restaurant delivers, I don’t have to suffer through L.A. traffic and I definitely don’t have to get dressed up. And you better believe that whenever I break open those boxes of my favorite takeout foods, I make sure to bust out the wine, too. My general rule of thumb when selecting a wine to pair with my takeout is to not spend a ton of money! A casual takeout dinner spent noshing on Pad Thai and catching up on my favorite Bravo shows appropriately calls for a wallet-friendly grocery store wine.

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A glass of Riesling alongside a slightly-spicy Pad Thai and fresh veggie rolls is a no-brainer for me! Chateau Ste. Michelle 2014 Columbia Valley Riesling (WE 89 pts.) is a smart grocery store buy at $9.99.

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Indian + Riesling or Chenin Blanc-Viognier Blend

Indian food is my favorite during the wintertime. It’s flavorful and comforting, but it can also be extremely spicy. I like tempering the heat with a Riesling or, my current favorite, the crisp Pine Ridge Chenin Blanc + Viognier blend. Fragrant Meyer lemon, citrus blossom, and white tea greet the nose, while honeyed tangerine fruits excite the palate in this uncommon yet ingenious blend.

BBQ + Pinot Noir or Rosé

Barbecue is without a doubt one of my favorite types of food, so it’s rather fitting that Pinot Noir makes for a great pairing. When you’re dealing with smoky meats, you want to choose a wine with rich fruit, like the cherry and berry flavors of Pinot Noir. If you’re not big into Pinot or are looking for a cool glass of wine, a dry rosé is a refreshing alternative.

Mexican + Albariño or ‘GSM’ Blend

We all know beer and tequila go great with Mexican food, but give wine a chance! If I’m eating a chicken taco or some ceviche, I love an Albariño; it’s a dry Spanish white wine that is similar to Riesling. Albariño can be hard to find, but it’s so worth the search! For carne asada and other red meat dishes, go with a ‘GSM’; it’s a Grenache, Syrah, and Mouvèdre blend that’s perfect for enhancing the spices.

Pizza + Sangiovese

The pizza and wine pairings are endless, but I think Sangiovese pairs best with both meat and vegetarian pizza. This Italian red wine showcases savory flavors like tomato and dried herbs, while also bringing bright, red fruit to the palate; it’s the perfect compliment to your pie.

Thai + Riesling or Gewürztraminer

Just as Indian cuisine can be spicy, so can Thai food. You’ll want a white wine that helps lower the heat, but also cuts through the salt. An aromatic white wine alongside Thai food is a no-brainer for me; I absolutely love a Riesling or Gewürztraminer.

Sushi + Pinot Grigio or Riesling

Pairing wine with sushi can be difficult because Japanese food makes the most sense alongside grain-based drinks like beer and sake. If you’re keen on drinking wine with your sushi, try a refreshing Pinot Grigio or dry Riesling. You have to be careful not to go too dry or too sweet because it could clash with the fish!

Burger + Cabernet Sauvignon or Rosé

If you’re going to savor a juicy burger, you’ll want a classic and bold red alongside it. A Cabernet pairs great with a meaty burger, while a dry rosé pairs nicely with a turkey or veggie burger.

Chinese + Chenin Blanc or Sauvignon Blanc

With Chinese food, I like cutting through the strong soy flavors with an acidic-meets-sweet Chenin Blanc (think sweet and sour sauce) or a crisp, grassy Sauvignon Blanc. Ultimately, a light-bodied white wine is a winner with this type of cuisine.

 

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